Wednesday, February 26, 2020

DU Panel on “The Future of Democracy, Free Trade and Alliances in the Trump Era.”

On March 3, as the returns are coming in the Democratic primaries on Super Tuesday, a panel of experts at DU’s Korbel School will discuss “The Future of Democracy, Free Trade and Alliances in the Trump Era.”

Most observers believe it is a critical moment for American foreign policy. Powerful trends are afoot in the world.

  • Democracy is in retreat worldwide and the U.S. What should or could be done about it?
  • Tariffs are now common and foreign trade in decline. What’s gained, what’s lost in the new environment?
  • Alliances and treaties are disdained (NATO), breaking up (EU) or abandoned (TPP). Are we weaker or stronger without them? Is the rule of law, peace and prosperity more or less secure? 
  • Many foreign observers believe President Trump is likely to be re-elected. They are prepared for four more years similar to the last. What does that mean for democracy, free trade and alliances?

Join the discussion with Ambassador Christopher Hill, Senior Researcher Dina Smeltz of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, and Professor and Director of the China Center, Sam Zhao. I will present and update the election as the Super Tuesday results roll in.

Tuesday, March 3, 2020
Doors Open/Reception: 4:45 pm
Program: 5:00 pm to 6:30 pm

Maglione Hall
Josef Korbel School of International Studies
Anna and John J. Sie International Relations Complex
University of Denver
2201 S. Gaylord St., 5th Floor Denver, CO

SPACE IS LIMITED
Please register early
Free and open to public
Food provided

RSVP HERE 

Presented by the Crossley Center for Public Opinion Research, the Office of Global Engagement and the Center for China-US Cooperation.

Mitt Romney Won Debate With Barack Obama in 2012. Now, he’s Back to Talk About the Crisis of Democracy.

Most observers and the snap polls gave the first presidential debate in the 2012 election to Mitt Romney. It was held at the University of Denver on October 3 and was a high point for the Romney campaign, which ultimately lost the race and Colorado by 5 points.

He’s back this week to talk about the state of democracy with Anders Fogh Rasmussen, former Prime Minister of Denmark and NATO General Security. Senator Romney has spoken often about the importance of the rule of law and public character, but never more as than during his impeachment vote.

“Like each member of this deliberative body, I love our country. I believe that our Constitution was inspired by Providence. I am convinced that freedom itself is dependent on the strength and vitality of our national character. As it is with each senator, my vote is an act of conviction. We have come to difference conclusions, fellow senators, but I trust we have all followed the dictates of our conscience.”

The Crossley Center for Public Opinion Research is honored to be a cosponsor of the democracy program with the Korbel School of International Studies and other DU organizations.

Democracy has been an important issue for the Crossley Center for many years. In 2018, DU launched a podcast program called Engaging Issues directed by former business school dean, Jim Griesemer. One of the first programs done in two parts due to the level of interest was “Democracy on the Defensive.” To access the interviews directly, click here.

The overall site with a host of interviews with DU’s most interesting professors on valuable topics is here.

Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, speaks on Senate floor about the impeachment
trial against President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol in Washington,
Feb. 5, 2020 | Senate TV via AP.

Friday, February 21, 2020

Japan-U.S. Alliance and the 2020 Election

On March 2, the Korbel School will host a dialogue with experts on the vital U.S. and Japan strategic alliance. Professor Koji Murata from Doshisha University of Kyoto and Dina Smeltz, senior fellow on public opinion and foreign policy from the Chicago Council on Global Affairs will describe the current political environment in the Asian Pacific.

They will be joined by DU professors Ambassador Christopher Hill, Suisheng (Sam) Zhao and Floyd Ciruli for a panel discussion on the impact of the 2020 election on the alliance and politics in the Asia Pacific in general.



The Crossley Center for Public Opinion Research, the Office of Global Engagement and the Center for China-US Cooperation Present: Japan-U.S. Alliance and the 2020 Election.

Monday, March 2, 2020
Doors Open/Reception: 11:45 am
Program: 12:00 pm to 1:30 pm
Josef Korbel School of International Studies
University of Denver
Sie Complex, 2201 S. Gaylord St., Denver, CO
The Forum, 1st Floor, Room 1020

SPACE IS LIMITED
Please register early
Free and open to public
Lunch provided

RSVP HERE 

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Foreign Policy News Pivots to Asia - Feb. 4 Event

Asia continues to dominate the news from viruses, to trade deals, to North Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Current events reinforce the status of the alliance between the U.S. and Japan. The Crossley Center is starting this year’s program with a session on the importance of the relationship among the three key stakeholders – Japan, China and the U.S.

The Crossley Center, the Center for China-US Cooperation and the Office of Global Engagement have joined together to present: “Japan-China-U.S. and Japan’s Vision for the Indo-Pacific.” The first speaker will be Noriyuki Shikata, former Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of Japan in Beijing. At noon on Tuesday, February 4, he will discuss Japan’s relationship with China and the U.S. and Japan’s vision for a free and open Indo-Pacific. Joining the discussion will be Suisheng (Sam) Zhao, head of the China Center.

Minister Shikata’s presentation is part of a program to explore the U.S. and Japanese challenge in Asia. As I have written:

The strategic challenge for the United States and Japan in Asia is to engage a rising China, while maintaining a favorable balance of power for the United States, Japan and its allies. A robust U.S.-Japan alliance is critical to the effort and necessitates sustained dialogue on how the alliance can shape the regional order. Achieving that objective will require a strategy to maintain the balance in the Asia Pacific and to understand the benefit Japan brings to the strategy. Join the discussion.

Join us at 11:45, Feb. 4, 2020, in Room 1020 (the Forum).

LIMITED SPACE, RSVP HERE 

Monday, January 27, 2020

Japan-China-U.S. and Japan’s Vision for the Indo-Pacific

The Crossley Center for Public Opinion Research, The Center for China-US Cooperation & The Office of Global Engagement Presents:

Noriyuki Shikata
Former Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of Japan in Beijing
With Director Floyd Ciruli and Professor Suisheng Zhao


Tuesday, February 4, 2020
11:45 am to 1:30 pm
University of Denver
SIE Complex (The Forum), 1st Floor, Room 1020

Noriyuki Shikata was the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of Japan in China. Mr. Shikata has also been a Visiting Professor at Kyoto University’s Graduate School of Law/Public Policy and Harvard University. He holds a B.A. in Law from Kyoto University and Master of Public Policy (MPP) from Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

Event in cooperation with the Consulate-General of Japan in Denver

SPACE IS LIMITED - Please register early

Free and open to the public. Lunch Provided.

RSVP here

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Japan, the US and China in the Indo-Pacific

The Crossley Center for Public Opinion Research, the Center for China-US Cooperation and the Office of Global Engagement Presents:

Minister Noriyuki Shikata
The strategic challenge for the United States and Japan in Asia is to engage a rising China, while maintaining a favorable balance of power for the United States, Japan and its allies. A robust U.S.-Japan alliance is critical to the effort and necessitates sustained dialogue on how the alliance can shape the regional order. Achieving that objective will require the United States and Japan to articulate the strategy to maintain the balance in the Asia Pacific and understand the strategic benefit that Japan brings to the strategy. Join the discussion.

Noriyuki Shikata
Former Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of Japan in Beijing
Currently at Harvard
With Director Floyd Ciruli and Professor Suisheng Zhao


Tuesday, February 4, 2020
11:45 am to 1:30 pm
University of Denver
SIE Complex (The Forum), 1st Floor, Room 1020

Event in cooperation with the Consulate-General of Japan in Denver

SPACE IS LIMITED - Please register early

Free and open to the public. Lunch Provided.

RSVP here

Friday, January 17, 2020

DU Event with Minister Noriyuki Shikata

The Crossley Center for Public Opinion Research, The Center for China-US Cooperation & The Office of Global Engagement Presents:

Japan, the US and China in the Indo-Pacific

Noriyuki Shikata
Former Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of Japan in Beijing
With Director Floyd Ciruli and Professor Suisheng Zhao

Tuesday, February 4, 2020
11:45 am to 1:30 pm
University of Denver
SIE Complex (The Forum), 1st Floor, Room 1020

Noriyuki Shikata was the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of Japan in China. His other prior positions include: Deputy Director General, Asian and Oceanian Affairs Bureau; Director, Economic Treaties Division, International Legal Affairs Bureau; and Director, Second North America Division, North America Bureau. Mr. Shikata has also been a Visiting Professor at Kyoto University’s Graduate School of Law/Public Policy and Harvard University. He holds a B.A. in Law from Kyoto University and Master of Public Policy (MPP) from Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

Event in cooperation with the Consulate-General of Japan in Denver

SPACE IS LIMITED - Please register early

Free and open to the public. Lunch Provided.

RSVP here